Gretchen am spinnrad. Gretchen am Spinnrade 2019-11-18

Gretchen Am Spinnrade: II. Analysis

gretchen am spinnrad

Meine Ruh' ist hin, Mein Herz ist schwer; Ich finde sie nimmer Und nimmermehr. If one enjoys tracing musical genealogies, Gretchen am Spinnrade makes a good subject for speculation. Und k├╝ssen ihn So wie ich wollt', An seinen K├╝ssen Vergehen sollt'! One other thing, the songs begins in B minor, not D minor. Other notable recordings include those by , , , , , , , , , , and. This, plus the crescendo, builds tension which releases only to be brought back to the beginning, much like the ever-circling spinning wheel. The text was written by the poet Goethe, of which the full text and english translation can be found. She spins as she waits, and -- though the text excerpt used in 's song mentions nothing of these activities explicitly -- the composer translates the rising and falling motion of her foot on the pedal, the rotation of the wheel, and the twisting of the thread into an undulating and omnipresent accompanimental figure.

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Schubert's Gretchen Am Spinnrade: Text and Translation

gretchen am spinnrad

Nach ihm nur schau' ich Zum Fenster hinaus, Nach ihm nur geh' ich Aus dem Haus. Wo ich ihn nicht hab' Ist mir das Grab, Die ganze Welt Ist mir verg├Ąllt. This is met with an abrupt stop in the piano, symbolising the stopping of her spinning yarn, accompanying the voice with mere dotted-minim chords, allowing Gretchen's voice to shine through and all her emotions to be concentrated on the kiss she's sharing with Faust; Almost as if her heart has stopped. This idea of representing the spinning wheel is explored further by the way Schubert has composed the left hand accompaniment using a dotted minim pedal tone, with a quaver note, then a quaver rest, then two quaver notes. This is not only suggested by an illustration but a literal continuous sixteenth note pattern in the right hand and the reciprocating motion of the treadle by the left hand that sets the scene. After this stuttering start, the motif from the beginning of the piece returns in a minor key once again is still aching, yearning for Faust.

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Gretchen am Spinnrade

gretchen am spinnrad

Meine Ruh' ist hin, Mein Herz ist schwer; Ich finde sie nimmer Und nimmermehr. One of the things that Faust wants is Gretchen, but the romance ends in murder and infanticide. Mein armer Kopf Ist mir verr├╝ckt, Mein armer Sinn Ist mir zerst├╝ckt. This time he was transported by his genius. F ollowing this 'high point', there are three bars almost note-for-note repeated one after another representing Gretchen's pedal movements, kick starting the motion of the wheel once again. This reduction in volume also allows the piece's build up to appear more profound due to the increased dynamic range.

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Gretchen am Spinnrade

gretchen am spinnrad

This relates to the question of key, because the more black keys you have the greater the difficulty for the right hand. The most striking moment in the piece occurs as Gretchen, with an exhilarating fortissimo ascent to B flat major, thinks of her lover's kiss -- at which point she can maintain the pretense of work no longer: having worked herself into a fit, she stops spinning completely, and only after several faltering efforts is she able to regain her composure and resume her task. If you're not sure how to find a major key's relative minor, just go to a piano, start with the tonic of the major key, and move down three half steps. This stuttering rhythm symbolises Gretchen's foot on the pedal as it drives the wheel. .

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Gretchen am Spinnrade

gretchen am spinnrad

She voices a wish for death upon his bosom, then utters once again the sorrowful refrain. The constant spinning of the wheel is represented by the repetitive 16 note semiquaver pattern played by the right hand. In addition, he alters the text delivery so that the ominous opening lines reappear throughout the song, always pulling the harmony back to the original key. The music's and Gretchen's emotional climax can be seen below. Additionally, the absence of the rhythmic, consistent treadle allows Gretchen to lose her sense of stability and reality as she swoons over Faust. On the other hand, Schubert contradicts Gretchen's return to composure in the last three stanzas by obsessively repeating her words to create a second climax on the highest note of the song , 110ÔÇö11. As she's watching him, thinking about him, the music gains more intensity, slowly rising in pitch up the scale.

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Gretchen Am Spinnrade: II. Analysis

gretchen am spinnrad

Much of the piece shows Gretchen overwhelmed by her love for Faust, and how it is causing her much distress because of this profound infatuation. Sein hoher Gang, Sein' edle Gestalt, Seines Mundes L├Ącheln, Seiner Augen Gewalt, Und seiner Rede Zauberflu├č, Sein H├Ąndedruck, Und ach sein Ku├č! The song ends as it began: in D minor, alluding to the monotony of the spinning wheel, and how reality is always present. The lied begins with a rhythmic accompaniment, replicating the sound of a spinning wheel. The very regular beats throughout the poem suggest the constant spinning of the wheel. Gretchen comes down from this fantasy quicker than before, as she realizes she and Faust will never be together. These steady rhythms pulsate underneath a similarly symbolic vocal line which acts also as a musical metaphor for the pedal movements made by Gretchen with many quavers leading into longer dotted crotchets, much like the motions of the left hand melodic contours.

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Gretchen am Spinnrade

gretchen am spinnrad

Gretchen begins to sing, expressing her most inner desires, leading the spinning wheel as her mind moves along with the rhythm of her hands. Gretchen's notes are also rising in register, all representing her rising emotions. Faust is lured into a pact with the devil, in which the poor scholar Faust gets whatever he wants on earth, with a promise to serve Mephistopheles in Hell. She is young, inexperienced and has fallen madly in love. The in the right hand mimics the perpetual movement of the spinning-wheel and the left hand imitates the foot treadle. With a heavy heart, Gretchen comes to terms with this hard truth. Certainly, Gretchen am Spinnrade can be considered one of the prime harbingers of high Romantic expression.

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Gretchen am Spinnrade

gretchen am spinnrad

Less than a century later, the anxious spinner would become the nightmarish and murderous psychopath in 's Erwartung. Similar to the previous section, the music returns to the home key of D minor as Gretchen resumes reality and begins her spinning once more. These rhythmic ideas can be seen in the score below. By 1823, had turned the unbearable tension of the spinning wheel into the more subdued angst of the mill wheel, in Die Sch├Âne M├╝llerin. As obvious as it may seem, what we're hearing really isn't just the spinning, we're hearing Gretchen's restlessness.

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